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Altibase: one of the top “10 In-Memory Database Options Power Speedy Performance” @ InformationWeek

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From Altibase to VoltDB, and covering options from IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP, we wrap up leading in-memory databases and add-on options. When you need speed, here are 10 tools to choose.

Yes, the death of the conventional disk drive has been greatly exaggerated, but Moore’s Law has brought down the cost of RAM so dramatically that in-memory technology is getting to be downright pervasive.

With its Hana platform, SAP has been the biggest champion of in-memory technology over the last five years. The latest chapter from SAP is S/4Hana, a rewrite of the company ERP suite launched in early February and designed to take full advantage of Hana’s in-memory power. The platform eliminates aggregates, indexes, and even the need for a separate data warehouse, replacing all of that with virtual views of live, transactional data held in memory. The approach shrinks the data footprint by a factor of 10 while speeding both analytical and transactional performance, according to SAP.

[ Want more on this topic? Read In-Memory Databases: Do You Need The Speed? ]

SAP didn’t invent in-memory technology and it certainly doesn’t have a monopoly on using RAM for processing transactions or analyzing data. Database incumbents IBM, Microsoft, and Oracle have each introduced in-memory options of their own. These are add-on options to conventional databases, not in-memory databases. But IBM, Microsoft, and Oracle tout the fact that applications designed to run on their flagship databases can now take advantage of in-memory performance without changes to those apps. You simply run key tables in memory to enhance transactional or analytical performance.

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Big data practitioners are also falling in love with in-memory technology. The hot, open-source Spark and Storm projects run in-memory, but these are purpose-built analytical and streaming platforms, respectively. This collection focuses on databases, so we look at NoSQL and NewSQL options including Aerospike, a DataStax add-on for Cassandra, MemSQL, and VoltDB.

The earliest purveyors of in-memory databases included Altibase, solidDB (recently divested by IBM), and TimesTen (acquired in 2005 and still owned by Oracle). These products emerged for niche applications such as telecom, financial trading, and high-speed e-commerce. Today these products are seeing broader use, branching into analytics, big data, gaming, and Internet-of-Things-style applications.

Read on to get a better sense of the breadth of in-memory databases and add-on features now available. Offering many times faster transactional or analytical performance (and, in many cases, both), these products are changing people’s minds about the practicality and affordability of in-memory computing.

Doug Henschen is Executive Editor of InformationWeek, where he covers the intersection of enterprise applications with information management, business intelligence, big data and analytics. He previously served as editor in chief of Intelligent Enterprise, editor in chief of … View Full Bio

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A Top 10 Tech Trend 2 Years Ago – In-Memory Databases are Now a Must

In the not too distant past, in fact, quite recently, many chuckled at the notion of RAM being used as a viable storage medium for database management systems. Boy, have times changed.

Database

I have heard it all:

“RAM is way too expensive, conceptually it sounds great, but it will never be used in the real-world.”

“Our data is important to us, so RAM will never work because if the power goes out, we lose all of our data.”

“I don’t need that kind of performance.”

According to a recent article in InformationWeek, 10 In-Memory Database Options Power Speedy Performance:

“Yes, the death of the conventional disk drive has been greatly exaggerated, but Moore’s Law has brought down the cost of RAM so dramatically that in-memory technology is getting to be downright pervasive.” –Doug Henshchen, Executive Editor of InformationWeek

“The earliest purveyors of in-memory databases included Altibase, solidDB (recently divested by IBM), and TimesTen (acquired in 2005 and still owned by Oracle). These products emerged for niche applications such as telecom, financial trading, and high-speed e-commerce. Today these products are seeing broader use, branching into analytics, big data, gaming, and Internet-of-Things-style applications.” –Doug Henshchen, Executive Editor of InformationWeek

“From Altibase to VoltDB, and covering options from IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP, we wrap up leading in-memory databases and add-on options. When you need speed, here are 10 tools to choose.” –Doug Henshchen, Executive Editor of InformationWeek

The reality:
Companies that are early to embrace in-memory DBMS technology will have a leg up on the competition. From real-time inventory control, compliance/policy control, defense and financial trading to authentication, marketing communications management and geo-location tracking, in-memory databases are taking over. In-memory databases still have a storage limitation defined by the amount of RAM able to be stuffed into a machine. However, single servers have the ability to handle 6 TBs of RAM, and this limitation is rapidly fading away.

The storage limitations do constrain some use cases that involve data warehouses and other massive petabyte scale deployments, but by and large, thousands of common use cases benefit from in-memory performance. This phenomenon will only grow over time.

With over several hundred in-memory database options available today, it is still remarkable that only a handful preside as the best of the best.

Altibase prides itself on its maturity, being one of the first to come to market in the world. With its humble beginnings 23 years ago as an academic research project, it is amazing that it is now the in-memory DBMS vendor-of-choice for nearly 600 of the top enterprises across the globe.

Altibase’s Hybrid In-Memory Database Implemented in Top 5 Global Messaging Company for Over 1 Billion Messages Per Day

Altibase, the world’s most reliable in-memory database, has been chosen for a top 5 messaging client (company confidential), trusted to manage over 1 billion messages per day.

Many studies such as the one published by Portio Research, are stating that the traditional Standard Messaging Services (SMS or text messages) have peaked in popularity and are being overtaken by what is known as Over-the-Top (OTT) messaging clients. Due to the rise in popularity and global availability of smart phones, Portio Research forecasts in their Mobile Messaging Futures 2013-2017 publication that by 2017 the number of SMS messages sent per month worldwide will drop to 658 billion and OTT messages will jump to 2.67 trillion.

A leading OTT messaging company (who requests anonymity), has chosen Altibase to handle its current high-intensity data load while also allowing the company to prepare for future growth. Altibase’s hybrid database, ALTIBASE HDB, has a unique hybrid architecture that flawlessly synchronizes a client’s in-memory tablespace and on-disk tablespace into a single unified engine. Altibase refers to this as 1+1=1.

This unification creates an environment where real-time data (hot) can be processed at blazing speeds while historical data (cold) can be stored on disk. The flexible architecture allows for seamless movement of hot and cold data, as needed, with the added benefit of complete data integrity. The hybrid architecture allows the company to handle real-time data loads and at the same time store volumes of historical data in one tidy DBMS.

“Altibase’s offering is unique. It has given our company the ability to save time and money while solving some of our biggest data-related issues. Altibase’s HDB has immediately helped our company with our current problems, but we also believe that it will help prepare us for the immense growth that the entire industry is forecasting.” – Senior Solutions Architect, Company Confidential

With over 550 enterprise clients and a huge variety of use cases in sectors spanning from telecommunications to manufacturing, Altibase’s in-memory database management system has been the database of choice for mission-critical applications across the globe since 1999.

In-Memory Database Services for Speed and Storage

Innovative approaches to  in-memory database computing offer enterprise clients improved speed and storage for Big Data applications.  Altibase recently announced that it is working with Intel, to help with the process of capturing and organizing large amounts of memory.  Specifically, Altibase’s HybridDB, which merges an in-memory database and on-disk database into a single, fully ACID compliant, SQL standard compliant DBMS engine, is using the Intel® Xeon® processor E7 v2 family to help support the large amounts of memory it needs to satisfy clients’ insatiable appetite for faster processing and memory.

According to Altibase, “Altibase conducted a test of HDB with the Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family. The results showed that the in-memory data performance improved in comparison to the previous-generation Intel.”

So what does it all mean for enterprise customers seeking extreme performance, capacity, and scalability?  The collaboration between Altibase and Intel allows higher speed processing, incorporating large volumes of data that is leading to measurable improvements of processing in-memory.  This is one of a number of successful recent collaborations between Altibase and Intel that are accelerating the advancement and deployment of in-memory database technology across businesses of all sizes.

For example, a few months ago, Altibase connected its HyrbidDB with the Intel® Distribution for Apache Hadoop (Intel Distribution) to allow users to execute real-time, high performance database processing from its HybridDB database management system while users were still able to scale and store data indefinitely using the Intel Distribution.

In this most recent announcement, Altibase noted that, “Intel Xeon processor E7 v2 family-based platform, and the in-memory data processing performance of Altibase … improved by 1.94 times compared to the previous-generation Intel Xeon processor E7 family-based platform.”

This improvement is enabling enterprise customers to experience unsurpassed in-memory database performance without sacrificing speed or storage.